ALA Awards Announced

January 28, 2009

If you haven’t heard by now, on Monday the ALA awards were announced at the Midwinter Conference.  Here are winners:

Newbery
winner…. Neil Gaiman – The Graveyard Book (listen/watch him read it here!)
honors…. Kathi Appelt – The Underneath;  Margarita Engle – The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom;  Ingrid Law – Savvy;  Jacqueline Woodson – After Tupac & D Foster

Caldecott
winner…. Susan Marie Swanson – The House in the Night
honors…. Marla Frazee – A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever;  Uri Shulevitz – How I Learned Geography;  Melissa Sweet – A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williams

Printz
winner…. Melina Marchetta – Jellicoe Road
honors…. M.T. Anderson – The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II, The Kingdom on the Waves;  E. Lockhart – The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks;  Terry Pratchett – Nation;  Margo Lanagan – Tender Morsels

I have to admit that so far I haven’t read a single one of these.  I’m hoping that changes soon.  I’ve heard great things about Savvy and The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, so those will likely come first.


First the Egg

March 23, 2008

This multi-honored book by Laura Vaccaro Seeger teaches children about how things develop — first a seed then a flower, a caterpillar then a butterfly, painting then a picture. With its simple pictures and colors, First the Egg is perfect for young children. The book also features a clever cut-out design that will have both kids and adults turning the pages back and forth.

First the Egg is a 2008 Caldecott Honor and Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book. The entire book can be previewed online courtesy of Lookybook. Click here to preview.


Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

March 10, 2008

Since its publication in 2003, Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! has been included on many “Best Books” lists and has received several awards, honors, and prizes, including receiving a Caldecott Honor in 2004. The book is a very simple in concept, pictures, and narrative. The story begins when a bus driver takes a break, telling the reader, “Don’t let the pigeon drive the bus!” For the rest of the story until the bus driver returns, the reader is in charge of preventing the pigeon from driving away. The book lends itself well to storytimes since kids will love to yell “No!” when the pigeon repeatedly asks if he can drive the bus. Parents will enjoy the similarity between the pigeon’s promises, pleads, and ultimate temper tantrum and situations they’ve gone through with their own child.

Once children have experienced the adventure with the bus, they can also enjoy other pigeon stories: Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late!, The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog!, The Pigeon Has Feelings, Too!, The Pigeon Loves Things That Go!