Diary of a Wimpy Kid

July 7, 2008

I had been looking forward to reading this book by Jeff Kinney for awhile because I knew it would be a quick read.  It was. I started and finished in about an hour. It’s written in the style of a “JOURNAL, not a diary.” I loved the cartoons depicting various situations. The story tells of middle schooler Greg Heffley’s year and the various problems he has, such as with friends, bullies, bad Christmas gifts, etc. As I read though, I really started to dislike Greg. He’s a jerk to his “best friend” Rowley…he’s bossy and eternally ashamed of him. I know Diary of a Wimpy Kid is really popular, so I’m interested to find out if anyone else had any problems with the “hero” of the story. Other than that, I thought it was a fun read. The cartoons are great. I may read the next one since it goes so quickly.


Kristy’s Great Idea

May 24, 2008

You can probably tell that I’m still in my graphic-novel phase, and when I found out there were graphic-novel versions of the first few books in the Baby-sitters Club series by Ann M. Martin, I knew I would be reading them as soon as I could. This is the first in the original series and the first in the graphic-novel series. I really enjoyed seeing the characters I love to read about in picture form. Raina Telgemeier did a great job adapting the story and drawing the characters. The novels are drawn in black and white, which did not bother me as I read, but now that I think about it, seeing them in color would have been more fun. Unlike the Nancy Drew graphic novel I reviewed last time, these books are true to the original stories. I’m glad Scholastic is re-issuing the books in this form. I really enjoyed them when I was younger (and still enjoy them today), and I’m happy young girls will get to meet Kristy, Mary Anne, Claudia, and Stacey. There will be four books total: Kristy’s Great Idea, The Truth About Stacey, Mary Anne Saves the Day, and Claudia and the Mean Janine.


The Demon of River Heights

May 16, 2008

This is the first book in the Nancy Drew Graphic Novel series. I was pretty excited when I picked it up since I always enjoyed reading Nancy Drew. Instead of being a recreation of the original first Nancy Drew book (The Secret of the Old Clock) this one is a modern story. I understand wanting to create contemporary characters for today’s young readers, but I missed the old Nancy, Bess, and George. The mystery was still there, though more technological with the use of cellphones and investigation of a filming crew’s disappearance. However, my least favorite aspect of the book: Modern Nancy Drew cannot remember to put gas in her car! I’m pretty sure Original Nancy Drew always remembered to fill up her blue roadster.

This is definitely worth a read – or maybe look since it’s a graphic novel and has more pictures than words. If this is how young readers today are introduced to Nancy Drew, it’s not a bad thing. I will be reading more.


Judy Moody

April 22, 2008

The first book in this series by Megan McDonald begins as Judy is about to enter the third grade. She is a typical third-grader, who lives with her family in Washington, D.C. She has an annoying little brother nicknamed Stink, a best friend named Rocky, and a few classmates she would rather not talk to. Judy’s last name is Moody, which suits her as she is often in a bad mood “…or something.” Judy is sarcastic, excitable, and creative. Kids reading the books should not have a hard time identifying with her. The books are extremely fun to read. I really enjoy them. You can see a taste of McDonald’s fun writing style from the cover of the first book that says “Judy Moody was in a mood. Not a good mood. A bad mood.”

Judy Moody is an extremely fascinating and fun character to read. So far there are seven books in the Judy Moody series. Since they are short chapter books, they are perfect for transitional readers…or older ages looking for a fun, quick read.